LGBT persecutions: still criminalised in some 70 countries- including imprisonment and death penalty.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/jul/27/gay-relationships-still-criminalised-countries-report

Gay relationships are still criminalised in 72 countries, report finds

50 years after Britain’s partial decriminalisation of homosexuality, in eight countries it can still result in death penalty

Fifty years after homosexuality was decriminalised in England and Wales, 72 other countries and territories worldwide continue to criminalise same-sex relationships, including 45 in which sexual relationships between women are outlawed.

There are eight countries in which homosexuality can result in a death penalty, and dozens more in which homosexual acts can result in a prison sentence, according to an annual report by the International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association (ILGA).

But Britain was by no means a frontrunner when it moved 50 years ago to partly decriminalise homosexuality. Some 20 other countries had already led the way, including France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Brazil and Argentina, all of whom had legalised it well before 1900.

In Iran, Sudan, Saudi Arabia and Yemen, homosexuality is still punishable by death, under sharia law. The same applies in parts of Somalia and northern Nigeria. In two other countries – Syria and Iraq – the death penalty is carried out by non-state actors, including Islamic State.

The report notes that, although the potential exists for a death penalty to be handed down under sharia courts in at least five other countries – Pakistan, Afghanistan, the UAE, Qatar and Mauritania

A co-author of the ILGA report, Aengus Carroll, said it remained the case that there was “no country in the world where LGBT people are safe from discrimination, stigmatisation or violence”.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/jul/27/gay-relationships-still-criminalised-countries-report

https://www.humandignitytrust.org/lgbt-the-law/map-of-criminalisation/

Map of Countries that Criminalise LGBT People

Key Facts

  • 72

jurisdictions criminalise private, consensual, same-sex sexual activity. The majority of these jurisdictions explicitly criminalise sex between men via ‘sodomy’, ‘buggery’ and ‘unnatural offences’ laws. Almost half of them are Commonwealth jurisdictions.

.

  • 44

jurisdictions criminalise private, consensual sexual activity between women using laws against ‘lesbianism’[…]

  • 11

jurisdictions in which the death penalty is imposed or at least a possibility for private, consensual same-sex sexual activity. At least 6 of these implement the death penalty – Iran, Northern Nigeria, Saudi Arabia, Somalia and Yemen – and the death penalty is a legal possibility in Afghanistan, Brunei, Mauritania, Pakistan, Qatar and UAE.

  • 15

jurisdictions criminalise the gender identity and/or expression of transgender people, using so-called ‘cross-dressing’, ‘impersonation’ and ‘disguise’ laws. In many more countries transgender people are targeted by a range of laws that criminalise same-sex activity and vagrancy, hooliganism and public order offences.

https://www.humandignitytrust.org/lgbt-the-law/map-of-criminalisation/

http://internap.hrw.org/features/features/lgbt_laws/

Among countries that expressly forbid expression of transgender identities, at least three, Brunei, Oman and Kuwait, have national laws that criminalize “posing as” or “imitating” a person of a different sex. Saudi Arabia has no codified law, but police routinely arrest people based on their gender expression. Malaysia also criminalizes “posing as” a different sex, not in its federal criminal code but in the Sharia codes of each of its states and its federal territory. Nigeria criminalizes transgender and gender nonconforming people in its northern states under Sharia.

The maps addressing criminalization of same-sex conduct include the 70 countries with national laws forbidding same-sex conduct. But others bear mention. The UAE has no federal law against homosexual conduct, but several emirates, do in their own penal codes

In Indonesia, Aceh province is semi-autonomous and criminalizes same-sex conduct under Sharia (Islamic law).

In South Korea, the military criminal code punishes same-sex conduct with up to two years in prison, even though criminal sanctions for same-sex conduct do not apply to the civilian population.

Human Dignity Trust has reported that 15 countries maintain unequal ages of consent

http://internap.hrw.org/features/features/lgbt_laws/

https://www.theweek.co.uk/96298/the-countries-where-homosexuality-is-still-illegal

The countries where homosexuality is illegal

Singapore court upholds law criminalising gay sex

The LGBT rights movement in Singapore subsequently regained momentum in the wake of India’s decision in 2018 to scrap similar legislation left over “from its own period under British rule”, reports Malaysia-based news site The Star.

Europe

No countries in Europe have laws explicitly preventing homosexual activities. However, The Guardian reports that increasing numbers of politicians and church leaders have been stirring homophobia to rally bases and provoke fear among voters in Eastern Europe. 

The future looks even bleaker, with Amnesty International warning that “legal rights are diminishing for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex people across the African continent”.

In the overwhelmingly Islamic Middle East, it is quicker to highlight the countries that do not currently have anti-gay laws than those that do. In several nations same-sex relations are punishable by death.

Bahrain, Israel and Jordan are the only countries in the region that do not outlaw homosexuality. Even in these countries, police protections offered to sexual minorities are minimal and vigilante justice often prevails.

Iraq decriminalised homosexuality in 2003, but the subsequent collapse of its government and territorial claims by the extremist Islamic State (Isis) led to widespread persecution and informal punishment of homosexuals, including execution.

Meanwhile, Asia has a mixed record on gay rights. Many countries on the continent have never passed any form of anti-gay legislation, including Cambodia, South Korea, Taiwan, Laos and the Philippines, while Japan decriminalised homosexuality almost 140 years ago.

https://www.theweek.co.uk/96298/the-countries-where-homosexuality-is-still-illegal

https://www.ft.com/content/393b3145-9567-4bfc-9ebc-0e92e4e2ddde

Singapore high court upholds law criminalising gay sex

Singapore high court upholds law criminalising gay sex

City state rejects three separate appeals arguing that the legislation is unconstitutional

Singapore’s high court has upheld a colonial-era law that criminalises sex between men, putting the international financial centre at odds with the liberal trend to embrace same-sex relationships. 

Singapore’s high court has upheld a colonial-era law that criminalises sex between men, putting the international financial centre at odds with the liberal trend to embrace same-sex relationships.  The city state’s high court on Monday struck down three separate appeals that argued that the legislation was unconstitutional. Under Singaporean law, a man found guilty of “gross indecency” with another man faces up to two years in prison. M Ravi, a lawyer who represented one of the appeals, said the court ruling was “shocking” but not surprising. The continued criminalisation of homosexuality in Singapore bucks moves elsewhere in the region to embrace LGBT rights that was invigorated by Taiwan’s decision to legalise gay marriage last year. This made it the first Asian jurisdiction to allow same-sex unions. 

He pointed to drafting legislation in Thailand that would allow broad marriage equality. “Once Thailand passes that [law] we believe there could be very significant progress on LGBT rights in countries like Cambodia, Vietnam, Laos and Myanmar,” said Mr Robertson.

In India, where the supreme court struck down a similar colonial-era provision to the one upheld in Singapore, even traditional heavy industry employers such as Tata Steel are taking steps to embrace LGBT employees.

While some parts of Asia have embraced LGBT rights, Brunei was last year forced to back down on new laws that would make gay sex and adultery punishable with death by stoning.

https://www.ft.com/content/393b3145-9567-4bfc-9ebc-0e92e4e2ddde

https://www.forbes.com/sites/jamiewareham/2020/05/17/map-shows-where-its-illegal-to-be-gay–30-years-since-who-declassified-homosexuality-as-disease

C: what about your LGBT refugees that get stabbed and sliced every other day in the Kukuma refugee camp? Is it how the UN treats their brothers?

 

 

 

Kenyan LGBT refugees live in fear of rape and assault

Lesbian and gay refugees live in fear for their lives in the Kakuma refugee camp, with, they say, the police and UN doing little to help

Nairobi — Eva Nabagala hoped she and her young son would be safe from her family when they fled Uganda for a Kenyan refugee camp — but instead she was attacked and raped there as punishment for being a lesbian.

She’s one of a group of about 300 gay, lesbian and transgender refugees in Kakuma refugee camp in northwestern Kenya, who say other refugees repeatedly attack them because of their sexual orientation. The group say police and the UN refugee agency, UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), have failed to protect them.

Nairobi — Eva Nabagala hoped she and her young son would be safe from her family when they fled Uganda for a Kenyan refugee camp — but instead she was attacked and raped there as punishment for being a lesbian.

Stephen Sebuuma, another Ugandan refugee in Kakuma, said refugees armed with iron bars, sticks and machetes damaged their houses on three occasions, injuring four adults and two children. “Police insult us instead of helping us.” 

UNHCR Kenya said as soon as they were informed of the attack, they contacted Kenya’s Refugee Affairs Secretariat, and sent an ambulance. UNHCR also contacted police, which had started investigations, the agency said. But Sebuuma said the police never helped them.

https://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/world/africa/2020-04-28-kenyan-lgbt-refugees-live-in-fear-of-rape-and-assault/

Lesbians, gays live in fear of attacks in Kenyan refugee camp

“I have been threatened with death, I have been beaten, I have been harassed sexually, and I have been sexually abused,” a lesbian refugee from Ugandan said.

April 28, 2020, 1:43 PM BST

By Reuters

UNHCR Kenya told Reuters that police investigate reports of violence, assault, or other crimes and UNHCR offers support to survivors.

“Whenever we are informed … we do our utmost to provide medical, legal and social-economic support and psychosocial counseling to survivors,” the agency said.

Kenya’s national police spokesman Charles Owino said he was unaware of any violence against the group of refugees.

https://www.nbcnews.com/feature/nbc-out/lesbians-gays-live-fear-attacks-kenyan-refugee-camp-n1194126

The maps addressing criminalization of same-sex conduct include the 70 countries with national laws forbidding same-sex conduct. But others bear mention. The UAE has no federal law against homosexual conduct, but several emirates, do in their own penal codes

A protest staged by embattled and exhausted LGBT+ refugees from a camp in Kakuma, Kenya ended in violence as police officers allegedly “teargassed, beat and brutally assaulted” demonstrators.

Queer refugees donned rainbow face masks for a peaceful protest outside the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees’ (UNHCR) office in the northwestern town.

The group – adults and children alike, many fleeing from neighbouring Uganda’s vicious anti-LGBT laws – have reported being under siege from assaults in recent months at the Kakuma refugee camp.

The pathos of their plight came as gay refugee and father-of-one was found dead in a suspected suicide outside the UNCHR offices in Nairobi. Adroa (not their real name) said this “sparked” the surging need to protest.

Demonstrators were calling on UNHCR organisers for increased camp security after months of being pelted with violence from Kakuma locals and fellow refugees.

Last year alone, queer Ugandans have been bludgeoned with machetes, had community centres mobbed only for LGBT+ staff to be arrested, a doctor crack the skull of a lesbian and a gay-friendly club raided leading to 127 LGBT+ people being arrested by army and police officers.

Embattled queer folk have fled to Kenya, but last year the country’s courts called to continue criminalising gay sex.

A group of homophobic people reportedly attacked a trans Ugandan refugee in broad daylight at a Kenyan camp, slicing his neck, punching him and then pulling on his genitals.

C: there are also several accounts of rapes.

Gay refugees sent back to ‘homophobic Kenya camp’

C: underlying question about the UN, when people like trump abuse power, when countries like china forbids technology enabling LGBT people to meet (apps were the only LGBT people could meet) in the whole of China, as there organisations and even bars are quasi-inexistent.

And since the UN has a systematic history of inviting the worst perpetrators of human right to preside and lead commissions and committees.

Lose trans, their reproductive rights.

Death,

Conversion therapy